Brexit: How To Be Positive With Your Clients

This time last week you were sitting at your desk thinking “has this really happened?”

You were wondering how the decision to leave the EU was going to affect your client’s desire to hire.

From the conversations I had last week the feeling seems to be that whilst some companies are putting things on hold, many others are proceeding with their plans (all be it with more caution).

What is clear though is that the country as a whole could talk itself into a recession.  In the coming weeks, there will be no shortage of media outlets seeking to publicise the “faltering economy”.   It only took the IOD a few days to release a statement about headcount freezes.  (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-36636574)

Recruiters have an important role to play in helping the country avoiding talking itself into a recession. There are about 100,000 recruiters in the UK. If they only speak to 30 people a week that is over 3 million phone conversations.

If recruiters run around saying “everyone is nervous”, “everything is on hold” or “we are dooooooomed!” It will not take long for companies to become negative in their outlook. This will then pass on to their staff and their desire to spend. Before too long we will be in recession.

I am not saying Recruiters will be responsible for a recession, but we have an important role to play in helping avoid it.

Leaders need to support their teams craft responses to questions such as “how is the market?” or “what do you see happening?”

These crafted responses do not need to be untrue but they need to be balanced. They need to balance the real concerns employers have with the positive news you hear in the market.

To help you and your team I have crafted a video exercise you can run with your team to help with this.

https://youtu.be/QkHAa-_uCvg

 

Bitesize Learning – Find time with Take 5

Learning at work, is a lot like trying to adopt a more healthy lifestyle

Everyone knows they should do it, but it’s hard to build a sustainable habit without some help. It can feel like a mountain to climb, unless you break it down into small chunks that you can easily achieve. That’s one reason why top companies are moving away from formal training to more informal, bitesize learning.

How does that apply to learning?

Just like exercise and healthy eating, learning is more effective when you do it every day. Over time, small achievements build up and give you a sense of momentum. You start feeling like you’re making progress and that you can take on tougher challenges. But that takes effort, willpower and planning, which is why most people don’t do it.

It doesn’t take much will-power to turn up to a training course and do what you’re told for a day. But face to face training courses aren’t all that effective at changing behaviour over time. They give you a large portion of learning that wears off quickly, if you don’t follow up and embed it. It’s a bit like eating 35 portions of fruit and vegetables in one day, instead of spreading them out across the week. There’s a limit to what your body can absorb. Everything else is just a waste.

We hate waste.

We hate it when people spend money on our training that doesn’t transfer to a change in performance. That’s why we apply the “little and often” approach to learning. Our courses are made up of bite-size chunks, most of which only take five minutes to complete. Our courses help people build a habit of regular learning. But what happens when the course is over?

We want to help people keep on learning.

It doesn’t take that much effort to find five minutes for bitesize learning everyday, but it does take some effort to decide what to do with that time. We want to make it easier to keep learning everyday. So we had a think and we came up with an idea we think could work for everyone.

We’re making bitesize learning easier with take 5.

All you have to do is take 5 minutes each day for learning. We’ll provide interesting content, across a range of relevant topics for you to read and watch. We’ll tell you what it’s about, why it’s worth your time and ask you a question that will make you think about how you could use it. You can share them with your team, or your colleagues, if you think they might like it too.

How does it work?

Take 5 is free and available to everyone. It’s aimed at recruiters, but the content is relevant to anyone who work in sales, business development, or leadership. If you want to give it a go follow the steps below. You can unsubscribe at any time and we won’t send you anything else unless you ask us to.

Step1. Sign up

Step2. Open the emails that arrive each day and read the summary.

Step3. If you like the look of it, click on the link and check out the content we shared. If not delete it and wait for the next one.

Step4. Think about the question in the email.

Step5. Share it with anyone else who might benefit.

It’s pretty simple.

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Take 5 is inspired by the work of Julie Wedgwood. She came up with the original idea and called it Find Fifteen. If you manage people, we highly recommend reading this full explanation of how you can use this approach to develop your team.

It doesn’t matter if you take 5, 15, or longer, just be sure to do something.

 

Three Thoughts No.3

Each week we round up some of the best posts we’ve read that we think you might find useful. We pick posts that will spark ideas you can put into practice.

Why not share your thoughts or favourite posts in the comments below?

No.1 Three Emerging Alternatives to Traditional Hiring Methods

  • Candidate Sourcing
  • Innovation
  • Assessment Methods

 

What?

This HBR article breaks the challenge of evaluating talent for recruitment down to two key questions: What should you assess and how? It follows this up by identifying three “bleeding edge” approaches to tackling these questions.

Why?

If you buy into the “war for talent” concept then you’ll want to keep abreast of the latest methods for finding that talent. There’s no doubt that all three of these methods are being applied effectively in other fields, so there’s good potential in recruitment too.

Read the full post

 

No.2 How To Be The Most Likeable Person In The Room

Jimmy Fallon
  • Relationship Building
  • Interview techniques
  • Techniques

 

What?

In case you haven’t come across him, Jimmy Fallon is a late night American talk show host, think Jonathan Ross only funny and likeable (he also has THE coolest house band imaginable). If you catch any of his show on YouTube it’s hard not to like the guy. One of the things he’s especially good at is establishing rapport with the people he interviews. This post analyses his style and pulls out some useful tips.

Why?

Recruitment is all about relationship building, you need to build great relationships with clients and candidates alike to be successful. Part of that process is establishing rapport, common ground and being likeable. The tips in this post are proven classics so get stuck in. (And it’s a great excuse to watch some clips of the show)

Read the full post

 

No.3 Why Self-Awareness is the Secret Weapon for Habit Change

Self-awareness
  • Reflection
  • Feedback
  • Personal Development

 

What?

Feedback is an essential part of learning and developing, but how often do you give yourself honest and frank feedback on your performance? That requires self-awareness and all too often we kid ourselves that things are going better than they really are. This post delves deeper into this essential topic for anyone who wants to develop themselves of their people.

Why?

Self awareness isn’t about zen happiness, it’s about giving yourself honest and ongoing feedback about your performance. Without it you are basically steering your ship with a broken compass and you won’t get where you need to go.

Read the full post

 

Three Thoughts No2

Each week we round up some of the best posts we’ve read that we think you might find useful. We pick posts that will spark ideas you can put into practice.

Why not share your thoughts or favourite posts in the comments below?

No.1 15 Steps to Peak Performance

  • Leadership
  • Psychology
  • Innovation

What?

Following on from Chris Froome’s second victory in the Tour de France, we had to include another cycling related post. Much has been written about the work of Sir Dave Brailsford at British Cycling and Team Sky, but this post from Cranford School of Management analyses the recipe for success better than most.

Why?

With 15 quite distinct ideas here, there is something for everyone. We recommend picking no more than three and taking some time to reflect on how you could apply them in your business. Then do some more research and dig a bit deeper. Don’t forget to share the post with the rest of your team to get their thoughts on how this advice could help. Why not make it a pre-read for your next team meeting?

Read the full post

(Hat tip to Creative Huddle for surfacing this one – highly recommend signing up to their fantastic newsletter)

No.2 Five Strategies to Grow Effective Leaders

alone with your thoughts
  • Leadership
  • Practical tips
  • New managers

What?

Another “listicle”, but this one offers some fresh advice that actually does what it says on the tin. These are all strategic tips that can help you build a strong bench and pipeline of leadership talent. What really resonated with us was the idea that leadership is something that should be encouraged and nurtured at all levels. That comes down to culture and your leadership style.

Why?

Leadership development programmes can be really effective, but what happens afterwards depends on your culture. These strategies can help to create a much more grown up culture of responsibility where everyone acts like a leader. If everyone in your business was thinking like a leader what would that do for innovation, for cost control, for business development?

Read the full post

No.3 Dan Pink on Persuasion

  • Influencing Techniques
  • Mindset
  • Empathy

What?

This is a short animation from the RSA based on a talk by Dan Pink supporting his last book “To Sell is Human”. It sums up the core ideas in the book ,of what it takes to be successful in sales or influencing today. According to Pink it’s about ABC; Attunement, Buoyancy and Clarity.

Why?

The premise of Pink’s book is that “we are all in sales now”. Obviously if you’re in recruitment, you’re in sales and you may feel a little patronised by someone coming in from outside and telling you how to do your job! However, Pink has done his homework and brings a wealth of insight based on sound research from a variety of relevant fields. If you like the video it’s well worth checking out the book.

Watch the video

Three Thoughts No1

Each week we round up some of the best posts we’ve read that we think you might find useful. We pick posts that will spark ideas you can put into practice.

Why not share your thoughts or favourite posts in the comments below?

No.1 You don’t know what you don’t know – how our unconscious minds undermine the workplace

  • Leadership
  • Psychology
  • Innovation

What?

Our brains don’t always work as logically as we think, we take shortcuts without realising. This post from Google’s Laszlo Block (SVP of People Operations) highlights some of the ways unconscious bias affect us in the workplace.

Why?

Our understanding of how we think has come along way in the past 15 years, but not little of this thinking has filtered through to the workplace yet. Behavioural economics is a field we’re very interested in and think you should be too, because it has a huge impact on how we make decisions and how we influence people around us.

Read the full post

No.2 How to manage your former peers

alone with your thoughts
  • Leadership
  • Practical tips
  • New managers

What?

This Harvard Business Review article highlights some great advice for anyone making that tricky transition from “one of the gang” to “leader of the pack”.

Why?

One day you’re on an equal footing, the next you’re in charge. That’s never an easy transition to make, especially if you end up managing a person who was going for the promotion you’ve just won. It’s something we find people in our leadership programmes often find challenging. So check out these tips and share them with anyone you know in this position.

Read the full post

No.3 Sir Dave Brailsford – CORE Principle and Marginal Gains

  • Data savvy
  • Psychology
  • Innovation

What?

This is an insightful video of Sir Dave Brailsford talking about two of the foundations of the success of British cycling over the past five years. CORE stands for: Commitment Ownership Responsibility and Excellence. Marginal gains are the small improvements that you can make, which on their own don’t appear to be of great value, but when you make lots of them, the cumulative effect is great.

Why?

These models are really useful ways to start thinking about how you use metrics more effectively. Stop hitting people over the head with activity metrics and start using them intelligently to influence performance and link performance improvements to the key strategic goals of your business.

Watch the video